Archive for the ‘Pelajaran’ Category

By Greg Stack
| July 20, 2012 |

So much about how and where kids learn has changed over the years, but the physical structure of schools has not. Looking around most school facilities — even those that aren’t old and crumbling –  it’s obvious that so much of it is obsolete today, and yet still in wide use.

1.   COMPUTER LABS. Students are connected to the Internet everywhere except in school. Regardless of their income bracket, most kids carry around a world of information in their pockets on their mobile devices, and yet we force them to power down and disconnect, and we confine them in obsolete computer labs. A modern school needs to have connectivity everywhere and treat computers more like pencils than microscopes.

2.   LEARNING IN PRESCRIBED PLACES. When you ask people to remember a meaningful learning experience from high school, chances are the experience didn’t take place in a space designed for learning. Working in groups, while on a trip, while doing a project or learning while talking with friends — those are the lasting, meaningful learning experiences. Yet we don’t design schools to accommodate these activities and focus only on the formal spaces.

3.  TEACHER-CENTERED CLASSROOM. Classrooms were designed for lecture and crowd control, with the teacher as the central figure of knowledge and authority.  The teacher had knowledge to impart through direct instruction and the current classroom structure works pretty well for this. This basic classrooms structure is the same, though in some schools, the chalkboard has been replaced by the interactive “Smart Board.” In progressive classrooms, the structure has changed: small groups of kids working, project work, and student presentations require rethinking this model.
4.   ISOLATED CLASSROOMS. Tony Wagner of the Harvard School of Education and the author of the Global Achievement Gap says: “Isolation is the enemy of improvement” and yet most schools are designed in a way that isolates teachers from each other. Teachers often learn to teach in isolated boxes and perpetuate that style throughout their career. Interior windows get “papered over” and blinds are shut. Yet out of school, people work in teams and are visually and often aurally connected.
5.   DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS. In order to break down the size of schools and to allow students to learn across curriculum, it’s essential to organize schools so that teachers of various subjects are located together. This not only emulates how people work today – in collaborative groups – but encourages teachers to consider students holistically, not only as they perform in a specific subject.

6.   SCHOOL CORRIDORS. Corridors take up a lot of valuable real estate in a school and are unoccupied most of the time. If rooms are arranged in groups around a common space, corridors are not necessary. And unused corridors can be made into informal learning spaces.

7.   TRADITIONAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES. In a modern school a library should be more of a learning commons able to support a variety of student activities as they learn to access and evaluate information.  Books have their place but they are not the end-all of libraries.  A learning commons is no longer the quiet sanctum of old, rather it is a space that can be central or distributed, used formally or informally, and one that can stimulate a spirit of inquiry in students.

8.   DARK, INDOOR GYMS. Most gyms have no access to natural light because of fear of glare that might interfere with sporting events. But with soaring energy costs, being able to turn off lights in a gym can amount to big savings. Designing glare-free gyms is possible but typically requires more natural light not less. Skylights, well placed windows and ample light create a great experience and a functional space.

9.   INSTITUTIONAL FOOD SERVICE. School food service usually involves folding tables that are placed and replaced throughout the day.  With cleanup activities it takes the commons/cafeteria out of action most of the day.  Why sacrifice this valuable space when it could serve multiple purposes? Creating spaces that require less movement of furniture while remaining flexible will allow them to be used more effectively.  Common spaces can also be less institutional, which in turn increases their flexibility.  Decentralizing food service allows students to eat in smaller groups and also allows multi-use of spaces.  Even if the food isn’t better, the space can be.

10.   LARGE RESTROOMS. Students try to avoid using school restrooms even in new schools because of concerns over privacy, bullying, and cleanliness contribute. To avoid restroom use, students stop drinking water and become dehydrated, and unable to focus. In Finland and other parts of Europe, they use individual restrooms that are located in the shared learning areas between classrooms. There seems to be a feeling of ownership for these, so they don’t get trashed. Also, they have more privacy, and there’s less bullying.

Greg Stack is an architect for NAC Architecture and specializes in developing best practices for the planning and design of educational environments. A version of this post originally appeared on School Design Matters.

SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL TRUCANO ON THU, 08/30/2012 – 09:44

in Colombia, entering a school of the past ... or the future?What will the school of the future look like?

Most likely, it will largely look like the school of today — but that doesn’t mean it should. Few will deny that it will most likely, and increasingly, contain lots of technology. Some may celebrate this fact, others may decry it, but this trend appears inexorable. To what extent will, or should, considerations around technology use influence the design of learning spaces going forward?

Of course, with the continued rise of online ‘virtual’ education, some schools don’t (or won’t) look like traditional ‘schools’ at all. Various types of structured or semi-structured learning already take place as part of things that we consider to be ‘courses’, even if sometimes such things don’t conform to some traditional conceptions of what a ‘course’ is or should be.  The massive online open course (or MOOC) in artificial intelligence offered by Stanford has received much recent attention, but the phenomenon is not necessarily new (even if its current exemplars are marked by many characteristics thatare indeed new, or much more developed, than those previously to be found in, for example, large ‘distance learning’ courses).

Let’s leave aside the case of the ‘virtual school’ for a moment and assume that there will continue to be a need for a physical space at which students and educators will gather and interact. (Such places may be access points to virtual education, or featured various types of so-called ‘blended learning’, where face-to-face interactions are complemented by interactions in the virtual world — or vice versa.)  Indeed, let’s assume, for our purposes here, that the school as a concept will presumably be along for many decades to come, and that it will have a physical representation of some sort. What might such a school look like, especially in the era of ICTs? (selanjutnya…)

I have been recently posting about teacher’s professional development using web technologies and each time I do I would get emails asking for the tools I use personally.  I compiled a list of the top 8 platforms I use almost daily for expanding my knowledge and staying updated about the topics that interest me the most. Being a graduate researcher in the field of educational technology and from my own experience of several years  blogging in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning, I highly recommend the tools below and I personally view them as the most important platforms for growing professionally.1- TwitterThis is by no means my favourite web tool for growing professionally. I use it to see what the education community at #edchat and #edech are talking about and I also learn a great deal from the feeds of the people I follow. Here are some more links to help you tap into the potential of Twitter for professional development.( don’t forget to follow us : @medkh9 )7 Steps to Grow Professionally Using Twitter This Summer10 Ways Teachers Can Use Twitter for Professional Development10 Powerful Twitter Tools for Teacher’s Professional Development2- Google PlusThis is my second platform in importance. I have been recently spending a lot of time on Google Plus following the feeds other share and joining in the discussions held there. I am realy finding Google Plus a very promising platform for teachers professional development and here are some articles to help you tap into it. ( Follow us on Google Plus)10 Google Plus Communities Every Teacher Should Know aboutExcellent Teacher Tips on The Use of Google Plus in Education20 Reasons Why You Should Be Using Google Plus3- PinterestPinterest is another socialmedia website I turn to to look for the latest pins in the field of ed tech and education. The same principle as Twitter and GP, the more people you follow the more feeds you be able to access. ( Follow our Pinterest board )10 Pinterest Boards Every Teacher should Know about16 Ways to Use Pinterest in Education4-Scoop.itThis is my favourite digital content curation tool. I have created a specific board on it for Educational Technology and I am also following several other interesting boards. Once you subscribe to the boards you like, you will start getting updates about anything added to them.5-FeedlyThis is an RSS reader and one of the best free alternatives to Google Reader. Using Feedly, I get to read my subscriptions in real time and it hels me keep track of what the blos I am following are posting.6- FacebookI am not really using Facebook as much as the previously mentioned tools but still is worth mentioning here. The trick is to have two Facebook accounts: one personal and the second one for professional development. It is through the second account that you will like pages, blogs and websites to read their live feeds on your wall.14 Great Facebook Groups Every Teacher should Know aboutThe Ultimate Guide to Facebook in EducationTeacher’s Guide to Creating Facebook Groups for Students7- Paper.lyThis is a Twitter curation tool that allows users to turn their tweets into magazine style format. I have been reading several paper.lys papers and I also find new and interesting food for thought.8- LinkedInLinkedIn is a professional social networking tool and I use it to make acquaintances with other educators and teachers from all around the globe. It also hosts some interesting educator communities where teachers get to share teaching and learning resources. ( Follow us on LinkedIn).

SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL TRUCANO ON TUE, 06/26/2012 – 14:57

CO-AUTHORS: CARLA JIMENEZ IGLESIASROBERT HAWKINS

not everyone is riding these big waves ... yetMuch of what we read and hear discussed about ’emerging trends’ in technology use in education is meant largely for audiences in industrialized countries, or for more affluent urban areas in other parts of the world, and is largely based on observations on what is happening in those sorts of places. One benefit of working at a place like the World Bank, exploring issues related to the use of ICTs in education around the world, is that we get to meet with lots of interesting people proposing, and more importantly doing, interesting things in places that are sometimes not widely reported on in the international media (including some exciting ‘innovations at the edges’).

We are often asked questions like, “What trends are you are noticing that are a bit ‘under the radar’?” In case it might be of interest to wider groups and/or provoke some interesting discussion and comment, we thought we’d quickly pull a list of these sorts of things together here.

Inclusion on the list below doesn’t mean to imply that a given trend is ‘good’ … just that it is apparent and interesting to us in some way. We don’t mean to suggest that these trends are apparent everywhere; they are largely born of our personal experiences, and so are perhaps informed more by strings of compelling anecdotes and ‘gut feelings’ about what is relevant than on hard data that we can cite.  We have deliberately omitted a number of trends that we have noted in prior posts that didn’t necessarily have a specific developing country focus (including those mentioned in an entry on 10 Global Trends in ICT and Education that is now a few years old) or which are cited in widely read publications like the Horizon Report (whose K-12 edition for 2012 was released earlier this month). In some cases, the trends have been observed and noted in more ‘advanced’ countries for some time, but are only now gathering momentum (sometimes with a twist) in many less economically privileged parts of the world.  In other cases, the trends may have emerged in developed country contexts, and are finding particular resonance in some less economically developed places.

With that explanation out of the way, here are, in no particular order … (selanjutnya…)

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ESEKOLAH v13.1

 | December 26, 2012

It may come as no surprise that the ideas that are top-of-mind for educators, parents, and policymakers are the very topics conveyed in the most popular MindShift posts this year. Giving kids the tools to create, teachers the freedom to innovate, making students’ work relevant in the real world, giving them access to valuable technology. These are the aspirations that have resonated most with MindShift readers this year. Here are the top 10 posts from 2012.

1. EASY WAYS TO INTRODUCE PROGRAMMING TO KIDS.

Being able to use the Internet and operate computers is one thing, but it may be just as valuable to teach students how to code. Giving students an introduction to programming helps peel back the layers of what happens inside computers and how computers communicate with one another online. Programming knowledge, even at a very basic level, makes technology seem less magical and more manageable. Programming also teaches other important skills, including math and logic.

2. 10 THINGS IN SCHOOL THAT SHOULD BE OBSOLETE.

So much about how and where kids learn has changed over the years, but the physical structure of schools has not. Looking around most school facilities — even those that aren’t old and crumbling –  it’s obvious that so much of it is obsolete today, and yet still in wide use.

3. WHY KIDS NEED SCHOOLS TO CHANGE.

The conversation in education has shifted towards outcomes and training kids for jobs of the future, and in many ways the traditional classroom has become obsolete. And yet many people fear change, preferring to hunker down and take the conservative route. Yet, it’s exactly during these uncertain times when people must be willing to try new things, to be more open, curious and experimental, said educator Madeline Levine.

4. LEARNING SHOULD BE MESSY.

Can creativity be taught? Absolutely. The real question is: “How do we teach it?” In school, instead of crossing subjects and classes, we teach them in a very rigid manner. Very rarely do you witness math and science teachers or English and history teachers collaborating with each other. Sticking in your silo, shell, and expertise is comfortable. Well, it’s time to crack that shell. It’s time to abolish silos and subjects.

5. MAKING CELL PHONES WORK IN THE CLASSROOM.

At its core, the issues associated with mobile learning get to the very fundamentals of what happens in class everyday. At their best, cell phones and mobile devices seamlessly facilitate what students and teachers already do in thriving, inspiring classrooms. Students communicate and collaborate with each other and the teacher. They apply facts and information they’ve found to formulate or back up their ideas. They create projects to deepen their understanding, association with, and presentation of ideas.

6. TURN YOUR CLASSROOM INTO AN IDEA FACTORY.

If we’re serious about preparing students to become innovators, educators have some hard work ahead. Getting students ready to tackle tomorrow’s challenges means helping them develop a new set of skills and fresh ways of thinking that they won’t acquire through textbook-driven instruction. Students need opportunities to practice these skills on right-sized projects, with supports in place to scaffold learning. They need to persist and learn from setbacks. That’s how they’ll develop the confidence to tackle difficult problems.

7. OPEN EDUCATION RESOURCES FOR ALL.

As open educational resources and OpenCourseWare (OCW) increase in popularity and usage, there are a number of new resources out there that do offer opportunity for interaction and engagement with the material.

8. FOR STUDENTS, WHY THE QUESTION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE ANSWER.

In a traditional classroom, the teacher is the center of attention, the owner of knowledge and information. Teachers often ask questions of their students to gauge comprehension, but it’s a passive model that relies on students to absorb information they need to reproduce on tests. What would happen if the roles were flipped and students asked the questions?

9. DEFINING DEEPER LEARNING.

In preparing students for the world outside school, what skills are important to learn? This goes to the heart of the research addressed in the Deeper Learning Report released by the National Research Council of the National Academies of Science in Washington. Simply defined, “deeper learning” is the “process of learning for transfer,” meaning it allows a student to take what’s learned in one situation and apply it to another, explained James Pellegrino, one of the authors of the report. “You can use knowledge in ways that make it useful in new situations,” he said.

10. HOW CAN WE CONNECT SCHOOL LIFE TO REAL LIFE.

So what if we were to say that, starting this year, even with our children in K– 5, at least half of the time they spend on schoolwork must be on stuff that can’t end up in a folder we put away? That the reason they’re doing their schoolwork isn’t just for a grade or for it to be pinned up in the hallway? It should be because their work is something they create on their own, or with others, that has real value in the real world.

Source: http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/12/top-10-posts-of-2012-deeper-more-meaningful-and-creative-learning/